About Us

The practice was formed by Hugh McNally and Dominic Morris in 2005. Our experience includes work across a range of sectors including;

-  Residential;
-  Commercial;
-  Retail;
-  Industrial;
-  Sports;
- Community and Youth

We specialise in residential architecture and one of our projects (House at Randalstown) reached the semi-finals of BBC Northern Ireland’s House of the Year 2009 competition. Our interest in the conservation of architectural heritage and sustainability in architecture also informs our work which has been featured in a number of press publications.

Our desire to make a positive contribution to contemporary society drives our work. We strive to meet our social responsibility as designers of places for occupation by people and to this end we continually seek to expand our knowledge base and the depth of our expertise.

Dominic has developed special interests in sustainability and conservation of historic buildings. He is a qualified conservation architect and holds a diploma in Conservation and sits on the RSUA’s Sustainability Committee. Dominic is registered with the Architects Registration Board and is a member of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Royal institute of Architects of Ireland (RIAI).

Hugh pursues an interest in the relationship between architecture and community through work with community organizations and research at the Institute of Irish studies (QUB). Hugh is registered with the Architects Registration Board and is a member of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

In 2010 we participated in “Street Society” a one week design research office organized by Architecture at QUB. This was a one-week “live project”, where we provided the opportunity for students of architecture to work with one of our clients (Gilford Community Club) on a real-life project outside the University.

In 2012/13 McNally Morris Architects were the beneficiaries of a Creative Industries Innovation Fund grant from the Arts Council NI for a joint research project with Architecture at Queens University Belfast. The project was an investigation into the relationship between autism and the built environment. This resulted in the publication of ‘ Aldo goes to Primary School’, a book that illustrates some of the issues that children with autism can experience in the primary school environment.